cyber1.org

PLATO Key Conversions

PLATO keyboards had lots of weird old keys. To reproduce these keys in pterm, you can either use the Function keys (those keys with F1-12 along the top of modern keyboards), OR you can type control-first letter of the old PLATO key, OR alt-first letter of the old PLATO key.

For example, to use the PLATO ‘back’ key on cyber1, you could either use the ‘F8’ key, control-b, or alt-b.

ctrlKeyALTPLATO
ctrl aF2ALT aANS
ctrl bF8ALT bBACK
ctrl cF11ALT cCOPY
ctrl dF9ALT dDATA
ctrl eF5ALT eEDIT
ctrl fSh-F4ALT fFONT
ctrl hF6ALT hHELP
ctrl lF7ALT lLAB
ctrl mF4ALT mMICRO
ALT nNEXT
ctrl qF3ALT q"square" or "access"
ALT rERASE
ctrl sF10ALT sSTOP
ctrl tSh-F2ALT tTERM
ctrl xDELKP *multiply
ctrl gINSKP /divide
ctrl pPgUpPgUpSUPER
ctrl yPgDnPgDownSUB
KeyPLATO
Enter NEXT
Backspace ERASE
F6 HELP
F7 LAB
F8 BACK
F9 DATA
KP ++ (+ key also works for unshifted +)
KP -- (- key also works for unshifted -)
KP lefta (that's the left arrow PLATO key)
KP rightd
KP upw
KP downx
CTRL KP -DELTA (also Sh KP -)
CTRL KP +SIGMA (also Sh KP +)
ALT KP Leftassigment arrow

For applications that use the shifted digits as they appear on the PLATO keyboard for various purposes (for example, in the editor, shift-0 gets you to part 10 of the file), use control-digit. Control with any non-letter will give you whatever is on the PLATO keyboard in the shift position of that key. For example, control = is ).

Nearly all of these can be shifted (which is why + and - are accessible via the numeric keypad—that's how you can reach the shifted forms). TERM and FONT are the same shifted or not because those correspond to shifted keys (shifted ANS and MICRO respectively) on the PLATO keyboard. If you are new to PLATO, we suggest first learning F6 through F10, as these will cover the majority of keyboard conversion hassles. Maybe jot them down on a paper and put it next to your keyboard until you have them memorized.


True-Type Fonts

Paul Koning and Adam Baum made some TrueType versions of PLATO fonts. These are not necessary for pterm but their significance is discussed on the system in the notesfile =ptermdev, archive 01/26/2006, note #33, titled "standard font", dated 10/17/2006. The ones made of pixels were made by Paul, the other two by Adam.

Here they are as individual downloads:

PlatoAscii.ttf, PlatoMicro.ttf, platopixels.ttf, platopixelsbold.ttf